How Often To Change Catheter

How Often To Change Catheter – 1 Patient education How to replace a Foley catheter Step-by-step instructions for caregivers This leaflet provides step-by-step instructions for replacing a Foley catheter, the tube in the bladder that is used to pass urine. A urinary catheter is often used by people with a condition that prevents them from urinating normally. This leaflet should give you an overview of what you have learned in the hospital. If you are not instructed on how to change your urinary catheter, call a rehabilitation medicine clinic or doctor. Foley catheters need to be replaced periodically to prevent infection. They are usually replaced monthly, but sometimes need to be replaced more often. Talk to your doctor about how often you should change your catheters. To replace a Foley catheter, do the following: Wash your hands with soap and warm water for at least 30 seconds. If you already have clean hands, you can use hand sanitizer. Don’t use hand sanitizer if your hands are dirty. Use soap and water instead. Allow your hands to dry completely before replacing the catheter. Collection equipment (see checklist below and illustration on page 2). Collection equipment Introductory tray: Sterile gloves Saline syringe Towel Drain tray Tweezers Swab Disinfectant Other supplies: Foley catheter* 10 cc syringe to remove old catheter New drainage bag Cleaning gloves Towel Soap towel Face towel Flashlight (optional) Thigh strap or other fixation device Catheter * We recommend a 14 or 16 gauge French catheter with a 10 cc balloon. Do not use a larger catheter or balloon unless directed by your doctor.

2 Page 2 Inserting the Foley Tray and Catheter Removing the Old Catheter 1. Lay the patient on their back. Take their clothes off below the waist. Stretch your legs slightly. Make sure there is plenty of light. 2. Put on clean gloves (not the sterile gloves included with the insertion tray). 3. Insert the 10 cc syringe into the fill port and pull the plunger back until all of the fluid from the balloon is drawn into the syringe (usually about 3 to 10 cc). 4. Gently pull on the Foley catheter to remove it. If the catheter doesn’t come out easily, stop and repeat step 3. If it still doesn’t come out, contact your doctor’s office, clinic or nurse immediately. 5. Empty the urine into the toilet, then discard the drainage bag, catheter and syringe. Pull the plunger to remove the liquid from the flask.

How Often To Change Catheter

3 Page 3 Preparing for insertion of the catheter 1. Wash the area of ​​your body where the catheter will be inserted with a towel, soap and water. Dry the area with a towel. If the person is female, this is a good time to find the urethra (opening to the bladder). See picture on page Remove and discard all used gloves. 3. Wash your hands again. Place the sterile insertion tray next to the person. 4. Open the sterile tray. 5. Remove the top flag and place it under the buttocks (for women) or under the penis (for men) to create a sterile field. 6. Open the outer package and carefully place the foil-wrapped Foley catheter into the sterile field. 7. Put on sterile gloves. 8. Prepare the tray by opening the disinfectant and pouring it onto a cotton swab. 9. Spread the lubricant and collect it in the drip pan. 10. Unroll the plastic Foley catheter and place it in the drainage tray. 11. Remove the rubber tip from the sterile syringe. How a Foley catheter works: When the catheter is in the bladder, an inflated balloon keeps it in place. Do not inflate the balloon for any reason until the catheter is in place.

Maintaining A Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter

4 Page 4 Inserting a new catheter: female 1. Using a gloved (non-squeak) hand, part your labia to view the urethra. Notice that the hand is no longer sterile. 2. Using your dominant gloved hand (writing hand), clean the area with tweezers and a cotton swab. Wipe top to bottom (front to back), one side at a time. Wipe the center of the urethra with a new swab. 3. Lift the Foley catheter with your sanitized dominant hand approximately 2 to 3 inches from the tip. Wrap the catheter tip in lubricant. 4. Place the drainage end of the catheter in the drainage tray. Slowly and evenly insert the tip of the catheter about 1.5 to 3 inches deep into the urethra until urine begins to flow out of the drain. Gently insert the catheter another 1 to 2 inches. If the urine doesn’t come out immediately, wait a few minutes for a few drops to come out. Never force the catheter into the bladder. Ask the patient to breathe slowly and deeply to facilitate insertion of the catheter. If you can’t get in, call your doctor’s office, clinic, or nurse. Drainage Tray Foley Catheter Replacement Drainage Tray 5. Insert the pre-filled syringe into the fill port. 6. Press the plunger (use 5 to 7 cc) to inflate the balloon. 7. Unscrew the syringe to remove it. 8. Gently pull back the catheter to ensure balloon inflation. At this point, the catheter can be attached to the drainage bag. 9. Pour urine into the toilet. Used equipment, including gloves, should be disposed of in the bin. Wash your hands again.

6 Page 6 Inserting a new catheter: male 1. Lift the penis with the gloved hand (the hand that you do not use for writing). If the person has a foreskin, pull it back until you can see the opening of the bladder (urethra). Notice that the hand is no longer sterile. 2. Using your dominant gloved hand (writing hand), clean the area with tweezers and a cotton swab. Wipe once in circular motions, starting from the urethra. Repeat this cleaning regimen with the remaining swabs. Wipe the opening of the urethra with the last swab. 3. Using your sanitized dominant hand, lift the Foley catheter 2 to 3 inches from the tip. Wrap the catheter tip in lubricant. 4. Place the drainage end of the catheter in the introducer tray. With your penis up, slowly and evenly insert the tip of the catheter about 8 to 12 inches into your urethra until urine begins to flow out of the drain. Gently insert the catheter another 1 to 2 inches. If the urine doesn’t come out immediately, wait a few minutes for a few drops to come out. Never force the catheter into the bladder. Ask the patient to breathe slowly and deeply to facilitate insertion of the catheter. If you can’t get in, call your doctor’s office, clinic, or nurse. Drainage Tray Foley Catheter Replacement Drainage Tray 5. Insert the pre-filled syringe into the fill port. 6. Press the plunger (5 to 7 cc) to inflate the balloon. 7. Unscrew the syringe to remove it. 8. Gently pull back the catheter to ensure balloon inflation. At this point, the catheter can be attached to the drainage bag. 9. Pour urine into the toilet. Used equipment, including gloves, should be disposed of in the bin. Wash your hands again.

8 Page 8 Do you have any questions? Your question matters. If you have any questions or concerns, ask your doctor or health care professional. UWMC Rehabilitation Clinic: Box N.E. St. Patrick’s Pacific Seattle, WA HMC Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic: Box th Ave. Seattle, WA Notes UWMC Rehab Medicine Clinic Box N.E. St. Patrick’s Pacific Seattle, WA Washington University Medical Center Publication Date: 11/2005, 11/2010, 02/2012 Clinician Commentary: 02/2012 Health Online Reprint:

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